Lillian stared at the incongruous door.

Why had it been added to the old stone entrance? Why the rusty chain in front of it?

She ran back to her father.

‘If there is a door, why does there need to be a chain?’ she asked.

Her father looked down at her.

‘So that no one gets too close to the door.’

‘Why can’t you get too close to the door?’

‘Because then you may be tempted to open the door.’

‘But what’s behind the door?’

Her father sighed. ‘Something best forgotten.’

‘You mean like my mother?’ Lillian looked up.

‘Exactly, like your mother,’ he replied.


ceayr-purple-door
© CE Ayr

Written as part of the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields (more details HERE). The idea is to write a short story of 100 words based on the photo prompt (above).

To read more stories based on this week’s prompt, visit HERE.

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84 thoughts on “BEST FORGOTTEN

  1. Dear Iain,

    That took an interesting turn at the end. Not sure it that was her mother’s crypt or just a reference to a less than desirable mum. And yes, by about the fifth story (sometimes tenth) I can predict where the stories will go. 4 years of experience. 😉 I also love to proven wrong.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The placing of the comma in the last line could be significant as to how you interpret father’s answer… Hope we’re not too predictable for you this week 🙂

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  2. Love this Iain! The dialogue btween the two is spot on and that last, killer line – cracking! Mum must have really been something else. You’ve got me intrigued and now I’d quite like to meet her 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. If I was that kid, I’d try to get in there. Secrets like this are too tempting. I think you lead us around by the nose with this one, and there’s only frilly dresses and mum’s collection of barbie dolls in there. Great writing, Iain.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Family secrets are always the best. I enjoyed your take on the prompt and the comments. I have a friend who has a similar view about his ex-wife and she’s not dead. It’s hard when you split up with someone and then have that ongoing contact through the kids when you’d just like to move on.
    xx Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true Rowena, my parents are separated and it’s tricky enough for the children to deal with, sometimes forget that it must be difficult for the adults too. Thanks for your kind comment.

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  5. I didn’t think the wife was buried behind the locked door. I took it more at face value that some things are better. I feel for the little girl who doesn’t and shouldn’t have to understand what happened.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I actually had the same questions about the chain in front of the door as the girl in your story, so I feel better having asked them vicariously through her. Not so sure that the answer about her mother is reassuring though. 🙂 Nice twist!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I had the chain in my story initially but had to cut it for length reasons. My narrator assumed it was a magic lock trap, and expected to be zapped when he touched it. When he wasn’t, he laughed at how silly it was to put a chain there as he easily stepped over it.

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